PFDAVAdmin and Exchange 2007

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If you have never used PFDAVAdmin (Public Folder DAV-based Administration Tool) to manage public folders and mailbox permissions, take a look at it, it’s a pretty nice utility. It’s not a new tool, but it can help you to do a lot of things “in bulk” that you might not have done as easily otherwise or at least certainly not as quickly. PFDAVAdmin works with Exchange 2000/2003/2007.

When working with Public Folder permissions on Exchange 2007 the tool is a great addition, for everyone who might not be that confident with managing PF permissions though the Exchange Management Shell (EMS) and would like a GUI for it.

However working with PFDAVAdmin on Exchange 2007 servers, I have seen this “error” message:
‘Could not expand https://localhost/exadmin/admin/mydomain.com/public%20folders/ : name cannot begin with the ‘0’ character, hexadecimal value 0x30. Line 1, position 386′

The reason for this error is because PFDAVAdmin uses Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1 (Exchange 2007 uses the .NET Framework 2.0) and if that is not installed, you’ll get the error message above.

Microsoft recommends using PFDAVAdmin from a workstation, not from the console of the Exchange 2007 server, though. So if you get this message, do NOT install the .NET Framework 1.1 on an existing Exchange 2007 server. You risk breaking the Exchange Server 2007! If you really want to run PFDAVAdmin from the console of an Exchange 2007 server, you would need to install the .NET Framework 1.1 prior to building Exchange.

Even so, using PFDAVAdmin from the workstation is much more desirable and recommended.

Download PFDAVAdmin here.

About Author

Peter is an Exchange specialist with over 15+ years of experience with Exchange Server and certified Microsoft Certified Master (MCM) and Microsoft Certified Solutions Master (MCSM) on Exchange Server. He has been awarded the Microsoft MVP award, every year since 2007. He is active in the Microsoft community and User Group Leader for CoLabora (a danish UC & Cloud User Group). He works as an Cloud & Infrastructure Architect and Consulent, with primary focus on Exchange, Office 365, Azure and Skype for Business.

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  1. Its too bad that MS kept Public folders. They are just cancerous entities. I’ve been in orgs where we had none and/or they just got whacked. That was a fun day for us IT pros. Now however looks like we have to deal with Public folders up until Exchange 2010…
    Rats!!!

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